Presentations and Recordings

Click below for presentations, recordings and handouts that were released by the presenters from the 2019 ARCS Conference held on November 7-9, 2019 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.


Numerical

9701 / B1 / T-form / SOS… help needed! Abilities and knowledge required as an art gallery registrar
Little attention has been paid to the differences that exist between working in a museum and working in a gallery, or the extra knowledge that a registrar from these types of places should have. In their daily work, gallery registrars are in constant communication with the rest of the staff, the artists, museums, other galleries, public and private collections, and with their vendors. They are inevitably immersed in the art market and its social impact; and their role is an important cog to the operation of the intricate machine that is a gallery.

This session seeks to show the work that gallery registrars do, as well as the challenges and problems that they face. What does it entail to work with living artists? What are the implications of registering and controlling pieces that are for sale? What is required to master the import and export of artwork around the world? Who are their allies when it comes to managing collections when they are not stored in a single country and are not under their direct supervision? What is the best decision: claiming the insurance of a damaged work or covering a new production? By discussing these issues we open up the possibility of streamlining what we do and contributing to the professionalization of our field.

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A

Acquisitions and Loans: Imparting Important Facts for Import
This session will cover the many standards, rules, and regulations that U.S. registrars and collection managers should follow, and will give guidance for importing acquisitions and loans from foreign countries: provenance research, vetting of cultural patrimony and export laws, U.S. State Department bilateral agreements, license controls within the EU, U.S. customs declarations, and FedEx declarations and process. The difference between “country of origin” and “probable country of modern discovery,” AAMD’s Guidelines on the Acquisition of Archaeological Material and Ancient Art, and the Object Registry will be discussed. Lists of U.S. trade bans and bilateral agreements will be distributed as well as a sample due-diligence checklist.

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B

Building a Unified Discovery System for Libraries and Museums
The Hesburgh Libraries and Snite Museum of Art at the University of Notre Dame have embarked on a three-year project funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to create a unified platform for the discovery of digitized collections. This session will underscore the importance of GLAM collaboration and explore how the development of this open source software will facilitate publication of institutional collections online. For institutions interested in providing unified discovery across multiple databases, or institutions looking to publish collections online, this session will cover the project overview, the challenges in mapping disparate library and museum data together, and the progress made during our first year and a half.

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C

Co-Ownerships: Concerns, Contracts, and Crossing borders
Co-owned artworks are becoming increasingly common. Reasons to enter into a co-ownership include the desire to share in a cost for a high value work, for an artist to donate a work to more than one museum, or as a means to share collections across borders. With these joint acquisitions come complicated contracts and various logistics to solve between the co-owners. The co-ownership agreements are not one-size-fits-all; each case starts with a similar set of questions: Who drafts the contract? Stores the art? Insures? Conserves? Processes loan requests? In the case of media art, are both museums issued a digital artist master and a certificate of authenticity? In addition to these concerns we will discuss sharing art internationally and navigating other countries’ laws on art acquisitions.

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Couriering Intensive: Essential Packing, Crating, and Courier Skills
This session will review different methods of packing, considering different mediums and various crating options for these objects. A discussion on couriering artwork, the basics and what to do when the unexpected happens will follow. We will provide a demonstration focusing on materials and what to consider when packing artwork to be crated, details to note on packing instructions and things to keep in mind as objects are being prepared to move. We will review various methods and solutions for crating artwork. We will briefly discuss standard procedures for security screening and securing artworks either in trucks or for flight. Finally, we will focus on things that have gone wrong in our experience and some of the critical thinking that was used in making difficult decisions on the ground.

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D

Databases, A Workflow, and A Student Staff : The Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum’s Approach to Digitizing 137 Years of Collections Records
For museums that rely on student or volunteer staff as its workforce, completing long-term, complex collections registration projects can be a challenge. Often-changing employees who have varying levels of experience can cause inconsistency in work quality and requires significant professional staff time for training and supervision. Over the past five years, The Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum has had success with tackling complex, multi-year projects using its student staff with a few simple tools: the museum’s object database, basic customized project databases, and detailed written work flows. With these tools and by breaking it into small steps, the student staff has been successful in moving large amounts of collection data from paper to database with minimal staff supervision. Two particular projects highlighted are the digitization of over 3,500 catalog cards and the transcription of a published 19th century artifact catalog and its three handwritten drafts.

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The Deaccession Toolbox – Making the Right Decision for Your Collection
In response to the enormous interest and continued debate within the industry relating to deaccession practices, the Deaccession Task Force was chartered in 2018 after AAM’s “Don’t Raid the Cookie Jar” workshop. Formed by representatives from four different AAM Professional Networks, the objective of the Task Force is to provide direction and guidance as to how to avoid the critical point in museum operations when divestment of collections seems like a light at the end of the tunnel. The Task Force has created the Deaccession Toolbox to help our peers navigate the sometimes treacherous waters of collection care and deaccessions. Although individual institution needs vary, underlying best practices apply to museums of any size and discipline. Join the Task Force for a discussion about the development of the Toolbox, their goal for sharing resources with peers institutions, and a demo of how the Deaccession Toolbox can offer direction and guidance.

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Deciphering Facility Reports
When you send your works out on loan you receive a copy of the Borrower's Facility Report, what do you do with it? What do you look for? How do you know what a red flag is? What's the difference in sprinkler systems? Alarms? How important is the building construction? Learn from a Registrar and Fire/Loss Engineer about how to decipher a standard Facility Report. Leave the session with handy notes and a key to interpreting the report so you can have peace of mind when lending and "signing off" on the Facility Report.

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E

Electronic Signatures Roundtable: Use on Legal Documents in Museums
Electronic signatures are becoming more pervasive when it comes to signing legal documents. How can museums and cultural organizations appropriately adjust when it comes to their plethora of legal paperwork? The decision to use or not use electronic signatures is complex, and we will help walk you through it. This roundtable discussion will begin with basics and definitions, and then segue into a discussion on the practical application and use of electronic signatures in regards to paperwork. Audience members are encouraged to submit their questions in advance to (email address) and to bring questions and experiences to the discussion.

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Emergencies: Before, During, and After
Planning: 

  • Rachel Dickinson: Focus on preparation
  • Rosa Lowinger: Protecting outdoor sculpture and earthquake preparation

The Event:

  • Rosa Lowinger: Sample emergency photos

After the Event:

  • Rustin Levenson: Response to a community wide disaster, dealing with mold
  • Samantha Forsko: Using the Command System effectively
  • James Pantoleon: For the future, innovations in dealing with emergencies
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Emerging Museum Professionals Roundtable
Attention up-and-coming registrars and collections specialists! Join us for a session designed by and for emerging museum professionals (EMPs). The first ten years of a museum career can be both exciting and daunting. EMPs bring energy and passion to the museum field, but it is easy to become overwhelmed by heavy workloads and long hours. This session, hosted by Memphis EMPs, with a panel of both emerging and seasoned professionals, will provide attendees with advice about a career in collections. During this question-and-answer style session, we will discuss common questions, concerns, and challenges that we all face. Topics will include potential career paths, specialized training, navigating the ins-and-outs of museum collections and registration, essential resources, and tips for avoiding burn-out. Through an honest and engaging discussion about working in the field, this session will inspire EMPs to lay the groundwork for a successful career in collections.

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Emotion and Pragmatism: Disposing of Objects from Museum Collections
We all know of objects that should not be in our stores, whether they were acquired in unstable condition, accessioned accidentally, or inherited from very different organizations. The UK Museums Association says disposing of unsuitable objects is good museum practice, but historic presumption against disposal and bad publicity around public disposals makes it hard to take the next step. This session will discuss how we developed a collections review program at National Museums Scotland incorporating an efficient disposals process. It considers the ethics, practical difficulties and opportunities which occur after you identify objects for disposal. Does it matter if the object is accessioned or not? How do you communicate the decision? Should you put disposals in land fill? Is it ever OK to sell objects? The speaker will use examples from National Museums Scotland to show that it is possible to successfully dispose of unsuitable objects to a wide range of destinations.

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Exhibition Copies & Beyond: Lending Time-Based Media
Museums and commercial galleries are seeing a dramatic increase in the exhibition of time- based media as artists continue to embrace cutting-edge technology: digital video, sound, motion, custom software and electronics, and installation/site-specific works combining any number of these elements. Despite the fact that many institutions still lack the expertise to manage media art, these ephemeral works are frequently being requested for loan from museums and galleries alike. Shipping, installation, and exhibition protocols for traditional works of art do not always translate to time-based media, and new practices and polices need to be developed for the specific needs of these media works. This panel will discuss the practical aspects of lending and borrowing time-based media artworks, including loan agreements, loan fees, documentation, exhibition copies, playback and display equipment, shipping, and other logistics.

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F

A Foot in the Door: Transitioning a Job into a Career
One of the hardest parts of building your career is just getting your foot in the door. One effective method is to start in a temporary, part-time, or volunteer role, usually front of house. This panel features international museum professionals who successfully made the progression from a foothold into a museum career, both private and federal. Panelists will discuss their career trajectory and provide insights and tips on ways to successfully make this transition. Changing roles, taking on additional responsibility, or switching tracks entirely can be managed more effectively with a strong network and a plan in place to make change work to your advantage. We will also discuss tips and tricks to make your job application stand out from the crowd, including building a personal website or developing a collections-specific portfolio.

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Fine Art Storage – An environmental and economical storage approach
We all know how important it is to conserve and store cultural heritage in an appropriate and long-lasting environment. When discussing Fine Art storage, questions are raised such as: How can Fine Art objects be stored in the best possible way? What constructional conditions are suitable? How can a building be designed with supreme storage conditions for art objects of any size and character (paintings, sculptures, photos, antiques, etc.), yet simultaneously contribute to ecological and economical challenges?In 2008, these kinds of questions led Hasenkamp to develop a green, CO2-neutral, high security warehouse. Ever since, Hasenkamp has expanded its knowledge in Fine Art storage and has built Fine Art warehouses across the European Union.Hans-Ewald Schneider, president of Hasenkamp, will shed light on what is necessary to plan Fine Art warehouses -- what pitfalls should be avoided and how Hasenkamp combines its expertise with advanced Fine Art storage techniques.

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Flexible Cataloging for Enormous Collections
What do you do with a couple thousand objects that need to be processed ASAP? When The Henry Ford received a large collection of the closing American Textile History Museum’s collection, we quickly had to adapt our methods in order to do just that. We knew well in advance that we would be getting an enormous donation, but once the archival and 3-D collections material began arriving on trucks and filled our temporary processing area we were shocked to see the sheer volume of it all. However, we were able to hit the ground running due to our thorough preparation and detailed recordkeeping. The methods we developed were invaluable to this project and could also be used to tackle backlogs.

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From Basics to Barcodes: Leveraging Technology for Collection Projects
For years, registrars used good ol’ pencil and paper to track their collections, but technology has now become a normal part of a registrar’s daily routine and the go-to method for managing collections. However, when faced with a large-scale collection project, how can you make technology work more efficiently? In this session, attendees will learn about the different object-tracking programs and devices implemented by three registrars who have recently gone through major collection projects. Each speaker has experience with varying sizes of permanent collections, differing budget restraints, and staff with different technological expertise. From embracing new technology such as barcoding and cloud-based systems to leveraging basic programs like Microsoft Excel, all who attend will find ways technology can be used efficiently and effectively.

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H

Hello from the Other Side: Next Steps in Collecting Time-Based Media
You’re getting a handle on the basics and now ready to take the next steps towards improving documentation of your “Time Based Media” collection. During this session we will present the latest procedures from institutions with robust programs for collecting and displaying TBM, and will provide strategies to build on. Laying the groundwork for acquisitions is about information, but how to make sure you’re getting the right information and how do you use it? LACMA will present their Time Based Media and Installation Questionnaire and its functions. Moving from acquisition to permanent collection means the work will get its own accession number. As there is no industry standard, the Art Institute of Chicago will present its development of their unique numbering system. Existing collections provide their own challenges when implementing new registration protocols. MFAH will present strategies for bringing historic collections up to date with an eye to developing an ongoing collections care plan.

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How to Win with Collections Data and Influence your Budget
Ever been asked to pull together a ten-year master plan for prioritizing care and detailing costs for maintaining your entire permanent collection in under an hour? We have! After throwing numbers at the wall to see what sticks every year during the budget process, San Francisco Arts Commission staff—in conjunction with the data scientists at Data-Science-SF—developed a cost projection tool to do the math for us. Using methods common to cost and prioritize the maintenance of building facilities, we customized categories to cover the unique parameters required for the conservation and maintenance of an art collection containing vastly diverse historic and contemporary materials, site conditions, scale and even micro-climates. And it’s compatible with our collections management database! Join us as we demonstrate the final tool, explain how we got here, and discuss how similar approaches can be applied to solve your own collection management planning conundrums.

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Howdy Partner! Mapping the Wild West of Exhibition Collaborations
Sharing the responsibilities that come with collaboration with another institution on a traveling exhibition is an appealing alternative to one museum shouldering the burden of the entire project. Effectively, curatorial, registration, publication, administration and financial responsibilities become a joint effort between institutions. These projects give colleagues the opportunity for rewarding partnerships. A crystal-clear contract, cooperating curators, and fantastic teamwork can make the experience fulfilling. Impact on the registrar’s office varies from project to project and things don’t often go as planned. This panel includes registrars from various sized institutions, and will discuss challenges and lessons learned from experiences working together towards a common goal—a seamless exhibition. Topics will include contracts, division of labor and staffing allocations, insurance responsibility, checklist and loan agreement sharing, budgeting, and shared cost reconciliation.

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I

I'm Gonna Convince You to Tweet #ARCSconf
As you look around, you'll probably see a lot of familiar faces: old friends, far-flung colleagues, favorite vendors. But we also need to think about who is not here, who has never come to an ARCS conference, and who may likely never be able to attend any type of professional gathering whatsoever. In other words, most of our collective registrarial family. You’ve carefully budgeted to be here, maybe you’ve won a competitive scholarship, sacrificed vacation days, or even paid entirely out-of-pocket to join us. That’s commendable. Professional development is at the core of being a responsible collection specialist, but it is a privilege to be here.

Everyone deserves the opportunity to learn from this conference, and the best way to disseminate the experience is by actively tweeting about it. This session will give you the tools, and encouragement, to effectively tweet #ARCSconf as a brazen act of equity.

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Indigenize and Digitize: A Case Study in the North American Hall at the Field Museum of Natural History
The Native North American Hall at the Field Museum of Natural History houses over 70,000 cultural objects. While the hall is undergoing much-needed renovations, the display of its collection is also being reevaluated. As part of the museum’s efforts to provide accessibility and dismantle its colonial past, indigenous artists such as Rhonda Holy Bear and Chris Pappan are lending their expertise to bolster artifacts which have long since been neglected. The mission of the project, a co-curated exhibit designed and operated by and for Native communities, is a model worth applying in other ethnographic collections. Using a digital platform such as eMuseums publishing software, we will create a sample of this exhibit. Selecting a handful of culturally powerful objects, we will promote the work in progress at the Field, while also allowing works not physically on display to be viewed publicly in a digital space.

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Installation On Display
In January 2019 the Barnes Foundation installed the exhibition Silent Secret Waterfalls: The Barnes Series, consisting of 11 large scale paintings by the contemporary artist Pat Steir, in a public area of our building. Installing where visitors could watch and interact was quite a contrast to the norm of working in our highly secure special exhibition gallery. The project was made especially challenging by the scale of the paintings, the largest being seventeen feet long, and the fact that the Barnes was experiencing some of its highest visitation at the time. This session will share insights into the experience, challenges, benefits, and take-aways, which will be of interest to staff of any institution considering installing art in public view.

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J

Jump-Starting a Move: the Integration of Collections Facilities at Parks Canada
Where do you start when combining six collections storage buildings from all over the country into one? With the move from an outdated, unstaffed facility, The Cornwall Collections Project aimed to shut down our Cornwall location and move its 13,000 historic objects and 2 million archaeological objects into an existing collections facility an hour away. We set about planning, documenting, and executing the move of a diverse collection, encountering a variety of issues, opportunities, and unexpected surprises along the way. With a new purpose-built Parks Canada facility scheduled to open in 2022, the goal was to gather as much information as possible for the future move of our five additional regional collections. This session will explore the project’s challenges, achievements and lessons learned, with an emphasis on practical solutions and common-sense problem-solving.

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K

Keynote Speaker—Joan Baldwin of Leadership Matters

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M

Mission Possible: Navigating Collections Inventory from Planning to Execution
Join this interactive discussion to learn how three collections specialists navigated the daunting yet exhilarating process of inventory. Each presenter successfully managed the planning and execution of their collection, varying in size from small to large (Evansville Museum of Arts, History & Science, Mississippi Department of Archives and History, Children’s Museum of Indianapolis). Come converse as they share all the tips and tricks of how they mastered their missions!

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N

The Next Revolution: How Blockchain Technology Will Change Collections Management
In November of 2018, Christie’s auction house in New York, in partnership with Artory—a company pioneering blockchain use in the art world, recorded over $317,000,000 in sales in the first auction documented on the blockchain. Now the buyers of these 42 works will have a secure, immutable record of those works that ensures that this publicly accessible information about the sale will never be tampered with.

Blockchain technology is most closely associated with the cryptocurrency Bitcoin that has now been around for over 10 years, but more correctly, it is the underlying software that makes logging cryptocurrency transactions possible. This software has many other applications that other industries have now begun to explore and adopt. Among these industries are art and collectibles. Several companies have already started blockchain-based platforms to track and confirm title and provenance. Likewise, other applications will include the tracking of shipments, securing databases, rights and reproduction, crypto-payments, and, in fact, blockchain-based digital artworks themselves.

The success of the auction with Christie's and Artory was a major step in legitimizing the technology and potentially making it more widely applicable to the world of museums and collections management. This panel will discuss the key players, the opportunities within collections management and the museum ecosystem, and, naturally, will provide a very brief description of the technology itself.

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North to the Future: The Power of Reciprocity
In 2018, the Anchorage Museum launched a project called Object Is to utilize the museum’s collections as a tool for learning, exchange, and sharing among indigenous communities in Alaska. Museum staff transported indigenous objects from the collection to communities nearly 200 miles away, challenging the notion that museums are physically static institutions. During the visit, museum professionals and community members – in particular elders and Indigenous knowledge bearers with direct ancestral connections to the objects – were able to gain and share knowledge. Held with intention outside museum walls, this collaborative project is a simple yet powerful way to work toward museum decolonization. The project joins other programs fostered by the museum that facilitate access to objects. This session will explore ways in which museums can use objects from their collections to collaborate and connect with their communities, establishing mutually beneficial and lasting relationships.

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O

Off Site Storage: Build or Rent
Almost every institution is running out of space in their own facility to store their collections adequately. Should you rent space from a fine arts warehouse or build/purchase your own facility? In this session we will explore the pros and cons of having your own storage facility versus renting space from a fine arts warehouse.

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On Preparing Successful IMLS Grant Applications
This participatory workshop will explore the strategies, logistics, and best practices involved in preparing successful IMLS grant applications for museum collections projects. After an overview of IMLS’s six current funding opportunities, we will examine the application process in manageable units, beginning with conceptualizing a project and ending with the successful submission of the application. Next, using abbreviated examples of actual applications, we will replicate peer review panel activities so that participants can develop a solid understanding of what's involved in the analysis and evaluation of competitive, fundable applications. At each stage, there will be opportunities to brainstorm ideas, draft application elements, and discuss our reactions.

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P

Preparedness and Networking for Successful Disaster Response
While systems for emergency preparedness and response have grown more sophisticated in the wake of recent disasters, much work remains to be done so that museums and historic sites are poised to effectively respond to incidents. Improving an organization’s preparedness requires imaginative thinking and collaboration that can overcome many capacity issues. This session will explore how institutions, and especially collections care professionals, can be better prepared by discussing successful and unsuccessful experiences with disasters. Attendees will leave the session with practical tools and inspiring ideas, which will help them prepare to face any potential disaster.

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Producing and Touring a Major Intercontinental Exhibition with Multiple Collections and Host Museums
Planning an exhibition for your own museum and planning its tour requires very complementary and different needs and resources. The session will illustrate how both activities (exhibiting and touring) intertwine into a multi-face challenges, and how these challenges can consolidate rich partnerships with the lenders as well as host museums. Topics including agreements, insurance, facility requirements, handling equipment, administrative bureaucracy, crating, packing and transport, blocks, showcases and displays, condition reports, and couriers and schedules will be discussed.

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R

Reshaping the Collectible
This session will focus on the first of six case studies that will be investigated as part of Tate’s ‘Reshaping the Collectible: When Artworks Live in the Museum’ research project, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This three-year project aims to develop new collection management and conservation models, building the museum’s capacity to collect, document and engage with artworks which challenge current practices. We will explore Tate’s acquisition and display of the pioneering American artist Tony Conrad’s Ten Years Alive on the Infinite Plain, a live performance work, including musical/projectionist performance and the use of an artist-invented instrument. How does a museum collect, document, care for and display an artwork that has complex external dependencies that have been activated in a diverse number of forms? How does a museum manage the status and care of a bespoke object that straddles the line between sculptural element and active instrument?

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S

Safe Art, Safe Planet
From existing models for waste reduction and partnerships for greater environmental accountability to concepts of cooperative solutions on minimizing our carbon footprint. The outlook for future generations is very troubling indeed, and the time to act is yesterday. These concerned individuals will share their views and the possibilities of programs both realized and imagined.

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The Struggle of Dawning Intelligence: The Removal of San Francisco’s Early Days Monument
On an early September morning in 2018, with dozens of Native Americans watching, the San Francisco Arts Commission removed the 124-year-old bronze sculpture Early Days from its granite plinth at the eastern point of the towering Pioneer Monument. The events in Charlottesville in August 2017 reignited the decade’s long call to remove the sculpture from its perch in front of City Hall – a sculpture that in 1894 was intended to represent California’s indigenous population using visual tropes now universally viewed as disrespectful, misleading, and racist. This session will highlight the community advocacy that resulted in the removal of the statue, explain the thoughtful process undertaken by the stewards of the city’s Civic Art Collection – balancing the requirements of best practices in collections management with public outcry, political protocol and the national spotlight, and illustrate the healing opportunities presented by a now empty pedestal at the heart of the city.

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T

Two Peas in a Crate: Crossover between Museum Registration + Fine Art Shipping
This panel of seasoned and dynamic professionals will highlight experiences from both sides of the industry to explore the ways their expanded viewpoints help tackle the evolving challenges of exhibition logistics. All of the panelists have worked as both shippers and registrars for various institutions and companies throughout their careers. During this conversation, our group will discuss how the industry and relationships between shippers and registrars have evolved over the past 10+ years, and how having experience in both positions informs how they approach projects and solve problems relating to lenders and loan agreements, non-traditional artwork materials, touring exhibitions, Customs and TSA regulations, and airport security for cargo and couriers.

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U

Using Business Tools and Strategies to Create Collections Management Processes
The Cleveland Museum of Art maintains an ambitious, year-round permanent collection rotation and gallery refresh schedule. In 2016, after the completion of an eight-year building project and subsequent Centennial Celebrations, the number, frequency and complexity of these installation projects had increased to such an extent that there was a need to more clearly define a work flow for projects from conception to completion. This session will detail how the CMA used business project management tools to create a permanent collections rotation and gallery reinstallation process roadmap. It will discuss the successes and challenges of the project and offer insights into bringing all departments into alignment to better manage the rotations and reinstallation process. It will also address how the CMA continues to use these tools and methodologies to define and improve work flows both within collections management and other areas of the museum.

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W

Who's Responsible? Liability Concepts when working with Service Providers
Museums increasing rely on commercial shipping, storage, and service partners to augment museum capabilities. These partners often provide critical operational support for a host of activities for both exhibitions and collections. These activities include interacting directly with lenders, packing and transporting whole exhibitions and individual works, rigging and hoisting, and providing long term, short term and temporary storage. While third-party support is common, registrars and collection managers should understand how liability is divided when working with an outside partner. By exploring some of the most prevalent activities, our panel will engage in a discussion that will help clarify the critical operational, security, insurance and liability concerns that will help museum professionals make informed decisions. 

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Winter is Coming: Cold Storage for Photographs
This session will present macro and micro views related to cold storage at two institutions: The Amon Carter Museum and The Metropolitan Museum of Art. In 2018, The Amon Carter expanded their photography vaults which required the relocation of 45,000 exhibition-quality prints. Devon Nowlin will present on the benefits of cool and cold storage, planning art movements, providing oversight on furniture designs, and the challenges that collections staff experienced. Similarly, in 2016 The Met moved a significant portion of the photography collection into a multi-zone cool and cold off-site storage. To facilitate this move, the collections management team developed methods of rehousing diverse materials ranging from 35mm negatives to oversized photographs. Meredith Reiss will share an overview of the project, including supplies used and final housing procedures which are applicable to large and small scale projects, whether a custom-built facility or a consumer-grade chest freezer.

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